Social media list. [Sticky]

December 21, 2016

in Meta

So, you’d like to connect with me on social media. A wise decision, I think, and I look forward to seeing you around. Here are the accounts that I use:

twitter Updated daily and contains all the kinds of personal information that I don’t want to bleed out to the world, so please forgive me if I don’t link to it.
twitter (Grassonmydesk): I don’t check Twitter very often, so please don’t be offended if I never retweet or favourite you and then retweet everything you’ve published for the last month.
facebook (Sarah McCulloch): Updated whenever I apply for a job or I think, “Ooh, that’ll be good to put on LinkedIn”. I really like keeping up with what people are doing career-wise, so do add me.
instagram (Grassonmydesk): Updated whenever I have something appropriate and I remember to post to social media via Instagram.
twitter (Grassonmydesk): Irregularly updated, where I post things I found cute, funny or pretty, no sad things ever. Follow if you want to feel better about life.
twitter (SarahMcCulloch): Subscribe for generally random videos that I either shot or edited, or for updates on new additions to my public playlists of terrible music (as judged by all my musical friends – I like McFly and I am not ashamed).
twitter (SarahCavie): A gamified language learning website. Battle it out with me to see who can learn French, Irish or Hebrew the fastest. I find this surprisingly motivating, give it a go.
twitter (Amatorlibrorum): A book cataloguing social network. I’m sure almost no-one reading this will be a member of LibraryThing, but if you’ve ever wanted to check out my extensive book collection (as faithfully recorded since 2008), or show off yours, or swap book recommendations, follow me here.
spotify (Sarah Cavie): My music habits are broad and also mainly electronic.
twitter (SarahtheOT): For autism and occupational therapy strategies and related content.
twitter (Sarah McCulloch): For completeness’ sake. Updated annually, generally on the topic of how much I think Google+ sucks as a concept.

I am also on Skype, Snapchat and Whatsapp, but I’ve already given you my phone number if you’re going to be communicating with me on any of those.

Speak soon. :)

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Part of my effort to see every Shakespeare play.

It’s been said, not unreasonably, that Henry IV Part 2 is something of a filler story between the clash of titans in Henry IV Part 1 and whatever happens in Henry V. Both of the two plotlines of the first part are carried forward – the continued rebellion against Henry IV and the jollies of Falstaff, with Prince Hal transitioning between the two, but this time the stories are more separate. Hal has made his commitment to kinghood and he and Falstaff barely speak. The rebels have been scattered and their leader is dead, so much of their story involves people standing in corners frustratedly shouting at each other. Consequently, much of the play is taken up with the adventures of Falstaff.

Prince Hal steps up to kingship.

This was not an accident, Falstaff was an extremely popular character when he first appeared on stage and so takes a larger role in the sequel and then got a whole play to himself in the Merry Wives of Windsor. He is a ridiculous unrepentant layabout and Helen Schlesinger again gives it all in gusto. She took advantage of the protuding stage into the audience in full, striding over and taking audience’s cans of beer and swigging them while delivering her monologues about sack. I noted to myself “not a lot happens but it’s great”.

As with Henry IV Part 1, there is a stripped down cast with each playing multiple characters, but in this performance, it had been made more explicit. I watched in absolute amazement as a scene in a brothel with Falstaff and his servant Ancient Pistol emptied out, leaving only his Mistress Doll Tearsheet, who slowly started to remove her garments and wipe the lipstick from her face until King Henry IV was before us. I had not noticed they were the same actor, at all, until that moment. It was probably the most striking part of the play for me.

Doll Tearsheet/Henry IV
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.”

The monologue that Henry IV goes on to deliver mentions his intended promise to go on pilgrimage to the Holy Land to make up for stealing the crown of Richard II, which I had seen staged seen earlier in the year. It was one of several moments that were essentially fan service for those who’ve seen all the plays. Henry IV then dies and Prince Hal becomes Henry V, to the rapture of his former drinking buddies including Falstaff, who hurtles down to the front of the stage/London to await his coronation. Unfortunately and to Falstaff’s great surprise, King Henry V repudiates him in public and moves on. The actor played it brilliantly, and you could feel his genuine sorrow underneath the bluster.

The play then ended rather abruptly, which I was somewhat surprised for what is, after all, a product of one of our greatest playwrights. I’ve looked at the text and there is an epilogue that I believe was missed out of the performance, perhaps because it references Falstaff appearing in Henry V, which he doesn’t, or perhaps because it was a bit to Elizabethan (asking the audience to pray for the queen). I don’t know, but that might at least solve the mystery.

This was also another play where I took someone along who had never seen a *play* before, never mind Shakespeare, but had absolutely loved it and said that he’d never thought of Shakespeare as something performed in front of drunks cheering you on (they weren’t that drunk). Falstaff for the win!

A scene from Henry IV Part 2 or Falstaff by The Globe Ensemble @ Shakespeare’s Globe

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Shakespeare Slam: Henry IV Part 1 – Hotspur

July 21, 2019

Part of my effort to see every Shakespeare play. Henry IV Part 1, or “Hotspur” as they subtitled it, is one of the most popular plays in Shakespeare’s canon, which was good to see after one of the least popular. The story of a rebellion against King Henry IV by the tempestuous Sir Henry Percy leading […]

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Shakespeare Slam: Pericles, Prince of Tyre

July 21, 2019

Part of my effort to see every Shakespeare play. Pericles, Prince of Tyre, is another one of the Shakespeare plays where, when I told people I was going to see it, largely responded with, “Shakespeare wrote that? I’ve never heard of it?!” The story of a royal prince who is shipwrecked and is left to believe […]

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In Excelsis – Lord Alfred Douglas (FULL TEXT)

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Shakespeare Slam: Richard II

April 23, 2019

Part of my effort to see every Shakespeare play. Richard II is one of Shakespeare’s most lyrical plays. Covering the final two years of Richard’s reign and chronicling his fall from power, it is one of only four plays entirely written in verse – there is no prose. Puns, rhyming couplets and soliloquies abound, meaning this […]

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Shakespeare Slam: Richard III

April 23, 2019

Part of my effort to see every Shakespeare play. It seems to me, there are three types of professional Shakespeare production. One, the Shakespeare specialist companies, the RSC, the Globe etc. They know what they’re doing, they hire people who are trained specifically to do Shakespeare, and they are badass at it. Two, the celebrity productions, […]

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A long-but-condensed guide to the even-longer Mueller report (April 2019)

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Originally posted to Facebook on 19th April, 2019. Edited for clarity. Previous comments: Your Trump/Russia Briefing (January 2018)Trump/Russia: The Michael Cohen Update (April 2018) * Yeah, this report in absolutely no way exonerates Donald Trump. Indeed, it contains pretty clear, and substantiated, allegations of corruption, witness-tampering, obstruction, and pretty much everything that all of his […]

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Shakespeare Slam – The Merry Wives of Windsor

February 1, 2019

Part of my effort to see every Shakespeare play. Merry Wives of Windsor was the first Shakespeare I’ve ever encountered that made no pretence to be literature, and is not treated as such by teachers and people who would make me study what are living, breathing texts. Allegedly it was written at the behest of Elizabeth I, who loved the character of Falstaff […]

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Shakespeare Slam – King Lear

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Part of my effort to see every Shakespeare play. Well, that was…intense. Ian McKellen was asked by the Chicester Festival Theatre, where he started his professional career many decades ago, if he would star in a play of his choosing, and he felt that he would like to “have a another crack at King Lear”. […]

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