Theresa May

DUP- Conservative deal signing looks like a gay wedding where neither set of parents approve

Originally posted to Facebook.

re the Tory-DUP agreement: I’m just going to be really honest and say I have absolutely no idea what the politics of our country is going to look like for the next six months.

The Government has literally sold out the nations and thrown a billion pounds at Northern Ireland in order to buy the votes of a particular party and there’s so many ways that could get pulled apart – but at the end of the day they have the votes to remain the Government.

But the agreement could be reviewed at any time by either party and the DUP have demonstrated how good they are at extracting goodies from a Prime Minister over a barrel.

But the DUP hate Labour and don’t want Jeremy Corbyn in power because he’s sympathetic to Sinn Fein.

But there’s several people planning legal challenges to the agreemnt on the basis that it invalidates the neutrality of the British Government set out in the Good Friday Agreement.

But the DUP are currently caught up in a corruption scandal over which Sinn Fein demanded the resignation of Arlene Foster which is why the devolved government was dissolved in the first place and it’s entirely plausible that they won’t form a government this week and James Brokenshire will have to call new elections, and who knows how the Northern Irish electorate will respond to this.

But he might not and impose Direct Rule from Westminster – a rule which is currently being propped up by the DUP.

But maybe all of this is irrelevant and they’ll just form a Government and we’re stuck with a Tory government clinging to power by its fingertips.

Will Theresa May be removed from power?

Will the Tories be able to pass *any* legislation not related to Brexit or counter-terrorism?

How are they going to pass any legislation *related* to Brexit when her own party has enough hardcore Remainers/Brexiters to render irrelevant the votes of the DUP if they decide to rebel?

And what are they going to do even if they do survive into 2018 and they lose enough by-elections through normal attrition that even with the DUP the Government no longer has a majority?

Like seriously, none of this has any precedent and I have no idea how this is going to go down.

Remember when people used to complain about how all the parties were the same and nothing ever changed? How do you think they like it now?

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Originally posted to Facebook in March 2017 and edited (including the comments of others) into a semi-coherent stand-alone piece.

Jeremy Corbyn Promotional Image Election Campaign 2017

In March 2017, Theresa May passed the legislation necessary to invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty and commence Britain’s exit from the European Union.

This has been a long time coming and there have been many efforts to soften what has been sharping up in Theresa May’s hands to be a very hard Brexit – crashing out of the customs union, the Single Market, and and the four freedoms. Lord Hain tabled an amendment in the Lords┬áto require the Government to negotiate to remain in the Single Market, but Jeremy Corbyn whipped his peers to vote against.

The amendment was defeated by 299 votes to 136.

As Politics.co.uk put it,

“This was not a vote on whether to activate Article 50. Corbyn couldn’t use any of his excuses about not being seen to stand in the way of the vote. This was an amendment to the bill, one which would have insisted that May pursues an exit from the EU which puts the fewest possible jobs and standards at risk. By whipping his peers against it, Corbyn worked with the government to make sure it did not pass.”

Lord Hain, who tabled the amendment, told peers that Corbyn would be judged by history to be on the wrong side of the argument “by forcing us in the Labour party to do something that we do not actually believe in”.”

At that point, I began to fall out of love with Jeremy Corbyn. [click to continue…]

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Letter to Theresa May re deporting Ugandan lesbian Brenda Namigadde

February 1, 2011

Dear Ms. May, I am writing to you with great concern regarding the pending deportation of Brenda Namigadde this week. Brenda came here in 2003 fleeing persecution as a lesbian. Even setting aside the horrors of a system that has left her in legal limbo for no less than eight years, it seems hard to […]

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