Media

I was interviewed some weeks ago by the Evening Standard for my views on polyphasic sleeping. It was something of a blast from the past for me but as one of the few people on the internet to have done it and written about it, I get surprisingly regular, if infrequent, press inquiries on the topic. The journo who interviewed me said they would let me know when it would be published and forgot, so I only just remembered to look it up. It’s short but sweet:

 

Getting a good night’s rest once meant spending eight hours in a comfy bed, but now a growing number of people are applying a blend of science, technology and psychology to optimise their time asleep, and so make the most of their waking hours. From the hackers gadgetising their bedtime routine to the ‘lucid dreamers’ taking control of their nightmares, Londoners are transforming the land of zzzzzz.

Polyphasic sleeping

Can you survive on two hours’ kip? Polyphasic sleepers believe so. They sleep in short bursts every few hours to cut down the overall time needed. A normal night’s sleep is divided into four or five cycles of three main phases: light sleep, deep sleep (the most restful) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The reasoning behind polyphasic sleeping is that you’re so tired you fall straight into the final two cycles. The most challenging regime is the ‘Uberman’ — six 20-minute naps at four-hour intervals. Sarah McCulloch, a student at London South Bank University, used Uberman while preparing for exams, for periods of up to four months at a time. Instead of her usual eight-and-a-half hours, she’d sleep at 4pm, 8pm, midnight, 4am, 8am and midday. ‘You have a few days of feeling terrible, but you adjust and it becomes like regular sleeping.’ The hardest thing, she says, is fitting it around a social life — she once had to nap at a restaurant. ‘It’s not that practical, but if you have a deadline to meet, you’ll meet it.’ Dr Guy Leschziner, consultant neurologist and lead clinician at the sleep disorders centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, cautions that it’s not for everyone: ‘Whether you sleep half an hour every two hours or a full night in one go, our sleep requirements are genetically conditioned. Some people need more, some people need less.’

 

You can read the rest of the article (on general sleep-hacking) here.

 

Related Posts:

{ 0 comments }

 

A few weeks ago, Channel 4 asked me to participate in their 4Thought programme on being LGBT and Jewish (I’d previously sourced them a friend for a different theme) to coincide with London Pride. I agreed, filmed it, and thought nothing more of it other than “ZOMG, I’m going to be on telly! And no-one watches telly anymore, so I don’t have to tell anyone if they make me look bad”. As it turned out, they took three hours of insightful, thought-out analysis on Pride, LGBT, Judaism, and our society, and produced a minute and a half of TV that barely mentioned Judaism at all and said not much more about anything else. Maybe I wasn’t soundbiteable enough.

More.

Save

Related Posts:

{ 0 comments }

Something Wiki this way comes – SX News 19/9/07

September 19, 2011

Gary, 37, is a straight man who has been cross-dressing since he was five. Last year, he joined the user-generated online encyclopedia, Wikipedia, to contribute new articles and develop existing ones in his chosen profession. But when Gary (not his real name) went searching for information on cross-dressing within the site, what he found both […]

0 comments Read the full article →

Handing over to the Next Generation

December 1, 2009

Originally published in the Essex Chronicle, at some point in 2007. It’s been two years since I first joined PEPYS, but as I turn 18, it’s finally time to say goodbye. I’ve managed to attend all 23 meetings since PEPYS began, written an article for this paper, attended two PEPYS conferences, and even addressed the […]

0 comments Read the full article →

Smoking is bad for you

December 1, 2009

Originally published in the Essex Chronicle, at some point in 2006. Smoking is bad for you. Everyone knows that. If you regularly smoke, chances are fairly high that at some point you will contract cancer and die. No-one disputes this, or can, and few people argue against passive smoking being a danger to the people […]

0 comments Read the full article →

Parliament Trip

December 1, 2009

Unpublished work for my school newsletter.October 2006. It dawned a bright and sunny day on the 28th of September, when I and 30 other bright and enthusiastic CCHS students set off with the equally relentlessly cheerful Miss Ellman and Mr Warner, to argue with MPs, look around my future workplace, and run my poor unfortunate […]

0 comments Read the full article →

Women in History – Caroline Norton

December 1, 2009

Originally published in The Riveter, September 2009. Few people have heard of Caroline Norton (1808-1877), as her efforts for women’s rights largely conducted through necessity and by the quiet lobbying of politicians whom she systematically befriended and turned to her cause, most notably the Prime Minister Viscount Melbourne. Nonetheless she had a profound effect on […]

0 comments Read the full article →

A level blues? How about a free gap year?

December 1, 2009

Originally published in The Ilkeston Advertiser and Bakewell Today, 15th August 2008. Volunteering charity CSV is offering a free gap year option to students across the UK who may have gained ‘unexpected’ A Level results this week, whether for better or worse. Thousands of young people will be making tough choices based on their A […]

0 comments Read the full article →

The Importance of Volunteering

December 1, 2009

Originally published in Essex Millenium Volunteers Newsletter in 2006. Volunteering, as we would understand today, essentially started in the 19th century with the Victorians ideas on charity. As they believed the individual was responsible for his own fate, the welfare system simply did not exist, and many were left to fend for themselves. However, kind […]

0 comments Read the full article →