Luminary Uprise

Perhaps incredibly, a sortable list does not exist of books of the Hebrew Bible, so I have created one. You can sort by title, number of chapters, or number of verses.

BookVersesChapters
Obadiah211
Haggai382
Nahum473
Jonah484
Habbakuk563
Zephaniah533
Malachi553
Proverbs*91531
Ruth854
Song of Solomon1178
Joel*21114
Micah1057
Lamentations1545
Amos1469
Hosea19714
Ecclesiastes22212
Esther16610
Zechariah21114
Ezra28010
Job106842
Nehemia40513
Daniel35512
Joshua65824
Judges61821
Chronicles176465
Samuel150555
Kings153647
Leviticus27859
Deuteronomy95934
Exodus121340
Numbers128936
Isaiah129166
Genesis153350
Ezekiel127148
Jeremiah136452
Psalms2526150

Related Posts:

{ 3 comments }

The Human Rights Act, despite what the Daily Mail says, is a very good thing for this country. It has protected us from house arrest, our DNA stored on a database without our consent, and various other things the government would have liked to have forced on us without considering our rights. Here are a few basic notes on its history.

  • The Human Rights Act 1998 is one of the most important pieces of legislation of the last century, if not of all time.

  • It was was included in the first Queen’s speech after Labour was elected in 1997 – however, this did not mean much as Labour had been promising a Human Rights Act since 1974, and had first mooted it in 1962.

  • The Act actually came into effect in 2000; it’s implementation was at the discretion of the Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine, who kept putting it back. It was feared that it would never be enacted. c.f. The Easter Act of 1926. The Chancellor claimed that the reason was the need to train judges in the interpretation of the Act. After several judges began delivering judgements as if the Act was already in force, however, the act was brought in.

  • After WWII, several attempts were made to prevent anything like it happening again. Both the UN and the concept of inalienable human rights were developed. Regional variations of this also arose. The European Convention on Human Rights was passed in 1950/1. The Attorney General at the time stated that the convention would be incorporated in UK law, but his party promptly lost power for 13 years and nothing happened.

  • The UK traditionally implements treaties through an Act of Parliament. Power was given to the courts in Strasbourg to overrule British laws. See also the Malone case, which involved the right to privacy and phone tapping.

  • 1991 saw the case of R v Home Secretary ex parte Brind, which was about freedom of speech for the IRA. The Strasbourg courts came down on the side of the IRA. As a consequence the senior law lord Lord Bridge decreed that therefore, where there was ambiguity in a Parliamentary Act and one interpretation was compatible with the Human Rights Act and one was not, the compatible one should be favoured.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

{ 0 comments }

Hoof and Horn

December 1, 2009

Another beautiful song which I happened to hear at Lama was Hoof and Horn. I include the lyrics below and a recording of Eloisa Ramos giving it her all. :) Interestingly, I have heard other versions of these and the version presented below seems to be two different songs, "Hoof and Horn" and "We all […]

1 comment Read the full article →

Once there was a time…

December 1, 2009

Once there was a time when the world knew only earth-based religions, which revered the female goddesses as much as the male gods. This song reflects that. Eloisa Ramos has kindly provided a recording of the song in order to preserve the tune, which can be found below the lyrics. The brief pauses are where […]

0 comments Read the full article →

Longest Word in English

December 1, 2009

  Sarah McCulloch.com vs Poland   Titin is the largest protein yet discovered. Its full chemical name is 189,819 letters long and, depending on how you define a “word” is the longest word in the English language. It is not included in the dictionary – few lexicographers accept chemical formulae as words. But when people […]

408 comments Read the full article →

Drink with the Beloved

December 1, 2009

The lyrics to the Sufi song “Drink with the Beloved”. I first heard this while dancing at the grave of Murshid Samuel L. Lewis, so I feel very blessed to have heard such a fantastic song at such a great place. Drink the wine down, tip the glass Drink with the Beloved Take this breath […]

0 comments Read the full article →